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 Rasputin: Was the “Mad Monk” Psychic?

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celticspirit
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PostSubject: Rasputin: Was the “Mad Monk” Psychic?   Thu Apr 14, 2011 7:01 am

By James Cofey

Grigori Yefimovich Rasputin (January 1869 – December 1916) was born in the small village of Pokrovskoye along the Tura River in the Tobolsk guberniya (now Tyumen Oblast) in Siberia.

Often referred to as the “Mad Monk,” Rasputin was considered by many of his time to be a “strannik” (religious pilgrim), and even a “starets” or ” elder,” a title generally reserved for monk-confessors. To this day, many believe he possessed psychic abilities and the gift of miraculous healing.

One often-cited example of these reputed powers occurred when Efim Rasputin, Grigori’s father, had one of his horses stolen and Rasputin was able to identify the man who had committed the theft by merely sensing it.

When Rasputin was around eighteen years of age, he spent three months in the Verkhoturye Monastery. His experience there, combined with a reported vision of the Virgin Mary, apparently influenced him to follow the life of a religious mystic and wanderer. Many historians believe that he also came into contact with the banned Christian sect known as the khlysty (flagellants) whose ecstatic rituals, which end in physical exhaustion, may account for Rasputin’s reportedly insatiable sexual attitudes.

Always described and depicted as an unwashed and sexually promiscuous self-styled holy man, history tells of Rasputin’s apparent part in helping to bring down the empire of the Russian Tsars (leading to the fall of the Romanov dynasty in 1917) after first becoming the personal confidant of Tsar Nicholas II and Tsarina Alexandra, as well as personal spiritual healer to their son Alexei. But despite his seeming influence on Russian history, there has been much uncertainty over Rasputin’s actual direct involvement as accounts are based on questionable memoirs, hearsay, and an ever-growing legend.

Already notorious for his many sexual affairs with aristocratic women (and later rumors that he had an affair with the Tsarina as well), Rasputin came to the attention of Tsar Nicholas and his wife when he had successfully healed the favorite hunting dog of a member of the royal family.

Tsarina Alexandra, said to have believed heavily in faith healing, became interested in his reputation because their only son (and heir) Alexis suffered from hemophilia, a painful malady which doctors has warned would end in death at a young age. Summoning Rasputin to the royal court, he is said to have healed the boy with prayer and the laying of hands. Rasputin’s influence over the royal family apparently stemmed from this seemingly miraculous act.

An outspoken opponent of war, Rasputin voiced his condemnation of Russia’s involvement in WWI at every opportunity–in the restaurants, bars, and halls, and in the bedrooms of the aristocratic women he bedded.

The poor decisions made by the Tsar during the time of Rasputin’s influence, coupled with the contempt his very presence in the Royal Palace evoked in the Russian people, probably contributed significantly to the fall of the Tsar in the final days of the dynasty. The Russian people had apparently lost confidence in their ruler at a time of grave crisis; the war was going badly and there were severe nationwide food shortages at home. And as public confidence waned, the revolutionary ideas that had already been fermenting in Russia for the previous fifty years began to bubble to the surface.

Seeking to distance the Russian government from Rasputin and his influence, Minister of War Alexander Guchkov charged him with being a member of the illegal and orgiastic sect, the khlysty. The Tsar, however, who openly referred to Rasputin as “our friend” and a “holy man,” would do nothing to alienate him. Taking matters into their own hands, on December 16, 1916, a group of nobles led by Prince Felix Yusupov, Grand Duke Dmitri Pavlovich, and the right-wing politician Vladimir Purishkevich, lured Rasputin to the Yusupovs’ Moika Palace by intimating that Yusupov’s wife, Princess Irina, would be present and receiving friends. (In point of fact, she was away in the Crimea.)

Once there, the conspirators then led Rasputin down to the cellar where they served him cakes and red wine laced with massive amounts of cyanide. According to legend,

Rasputin was unaffected, although Vasily Maklakov had supplied “enough poison to kill five men.” Two hours later, although Rasputin appeared tired, he was still very much alive. In frustration, Prince Felix Yusupov then got his revolver and shot him once in the heart, after which Rasputin appeared lifeless; Yusupov could find no pulse. But then suddenly, first one eye opened, and then the other, and then Rasputin leaped to his feet and attacked Yusupov, attempting to strangle him, all the while said to be “foaming at the mouth.”

Fleeing the palace, Rasputin ran across the courtyard yelling that he was going to tell the Tsarina, at which time Purishkevich shot him, striking him in the back. Rasputin stopped and Purishkevich fired again, sending him to the ground. Purishkevich then kicked the lifeless body in the temple, leaving a severe gash.

When the body was brought into the palace, Yusupov is said to have lost control, repeatedly beating Rasputin on the head with a blackjack. (Some accounts say his killers even sexually mutilated him, severing his penis.) Binding his body and wrapping him in a carpet, they threw him into the icy Neva River where the body was eventually discovered about seven hundred and fifty feet downstream where it had apparently traveled under the ice. The autopsy revealed that Rasputin had water in his lungs, indicating that Rasputin was still alive when he was dumped into the water. A photograph from the autopsy suggests that he had tried to free himself from his bonds even with his final breath.

Subsequently, the Tsaritsa Alexandra buried Rasputin’s body on the grounds of Tsarskoye Selo, and a short time later, the Russian Revolution eliminated Nicholas and his family.

While many legends follow the life and death of Rasputin, one of the most poignant is evidence that he apparently had premonitions of his own death, as well as the fall of Russia.

In a letter written by Rasputin he states, “My hour will soon come. I have no fear but you must know that the hour will be bitter. I will suffer a great martyrdom. I will forgive my torturers and will inherit the kingdom.” And in a conversation said to have taken place on the day of his death, he stated (perhaps, to the Tsarina) “Little mother, I feel my end is near. They’ll kill me and then the throne won’t last 3 months.”

After the “February Revolution,” a group of workers from Saint Petersburg uncovered Rasputin’s remains, carried them into the nearby woods, and burned them. As the body was consumed in flames, Rasputin is said to have sat up in the fire–his attempts to stand thoroughly horrifying bystanders. This final happenstance only further fueled the legends and mysteries surrounding Rasputin which continue to live on long after his death.

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PostSubject: Re: Rasputin: Was the “Mad Monk” Psychic?   Thu Apr 14, 2011 5:35 pm

Great post Celtic,

Ive always had an interest in Rasputin and his rumoured madness .

Firstly I want to say that the Khlysts were a btreak away group that split from orthodox religion and the original name was Khristovery ie Christ Believers . The Khylysts renounced priesthood, holy books and veneration of the saints . They were a secret organisation made up of cells , Rasputins daughter later denied any claim that he was a member saying that he investigated them and their practises then completely rejected them. They practised the attainment of divine grace through ecstatic rituals that are rumoured to have turned into sexual orgies .

I just wanted to be very clear that these people were not followers of orthodox christianity ... I like to stand up for the faith when I see written miconceptions about the Christians . ( Think I will get my place in Heaven for my trouble ?? )

:ROTFL: :ROTFL:

Fab post really enjoyed it Very Happy


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PostSubject: Re: Rasputin: Was the “Mad Monk” Psychic?   Fri Apr 15, 2011 6:12 am

I've always been fascinated by him as well but this is the first real informative article I have found.

I have never heard of Khylysts before now either so I will have to do some reading up on that so.... watch this space lol!!!

On another note I absolutely love Boney M and they did a song about Rasputin which I thought I would share (now you really do know I am completely bonkers!!)



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PostSubject: Re: Rasputin: Was the “Mad Monk” Psychic?   Fri Apr 15, 2011 12:46 pm

Ilove Boney M , fairly showing my age , they were all the rage when I was a wild child :ROTFL: :ROTFL:

That was a few years ago tho,im all sensible now :verymad:

:ROTFL:

I was aware of the Khlyst's and their nonconformist ways , not that Ive a problem with non conformists , but I just needed to clear that up Smile


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PostSubject: Re: Rasputin: Was the “Mad Monk” Psychic?   Tue May 31, 2011 10:21 am

Well all i will say to that post is , where did you get the inspiation to do this post from??, i wuld never off thought off doing a post on this man .....(i liked boney m too)lol , dos this make me as mad as fae lol

I really enjoyed reading it ty celtic.for your time and effortx



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PostSubject: Re: Rasputin: Was the “Mad Monk” Psychic?   Tue May 31, 2011 10:29 am

To be honest Mick, I am not sure lol!!!! I get lots of things in my head which eventually come to the forefront and I think I must post on that!!!!

Well if you like Boney M - yes you are officially as mad as Fae & I!!!! - I'll let you into a secret - I have most of their albums and I am only 33!!


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PostSubject: Re: Rasputin: Was the “Mad Monk” Psychic?   Tue May 31, 2011 1:02 pm

Ah shur Cetic you are only a young one Very Happy Boney M were the biz in their day , when it was my day :ROTFL: I had great fun , youth is definitely wasted on the young :LOL:


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